The first source for video clips about black holes, gravitational waves and cosmic strings

Scienceface.org:

The first source for video clips about black holes, gravitational waves and cosmic strings

About scienceface.org

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About the project and the team behind it

The purpose of ScienceFace is to make front-line science accessible to non-scientists, by filming top scientists in conversation with a young interviewer. Face-to-face, the interviewer and the scientist explore together how to make even the most remote research understandable. Each short interview tells an interesting piece of a larger story; the whole series weaves together to explain the entire research area. If the films spark your interest in fundamental science, teach you something new, or give you insight into the kinds of people who are passionate about scientific research, then our project is a success!

Our first series is on black holes. We interviewed 10 prominent scientists and have made 15 separate film clips. The films explore the science of black holes and the scientists' passion for black holes. The scientists talk with Annalie Schutz, a university music student who asks the questions that non-specialists want to ask. The results may surprise you, as the scientists find ways to explain even abstract ideas in concrete terms. And along the way they find unexpected connections between black hole research and everyday things, like pop music, noisy parties, web browsers, and even diapers!

Scienceface.org is an education and outreach project initiated by Prof. Bernard Schutz from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute) , Susanne Milde and Sascha Rieger from Milde Science Communication in Potsdam , Germany. The Albert Einstein Institute is one of about 80 institutes of the German Max Planck Society, whose activities span all modern areas of basic research. Milde Science Communication specializes in communication services for scientific and technical organizations.

Bernard Schutz
is a British-American physicist. His research is on Einstein's theory of general relativity , and especially on the physics of gravitational waves. He is a member of the  GEO and LISA gravitational wave projects and of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). He is the author of numerous research articles and several textbooks, and he founded the electronic open access review journal Living Reviews in Relativity. Annalie Schutz is his daughter.
 

The Host

Annalie Schutz is the host of this series of interviews. She studies music at the University of York, England. Her instrument of study is the viola, but you hear her playing trumpet in the theme music of our films. (See the next section on "The Music" for more about the theme music.) Annalie was born in Cardiff, Wales, and grew up in Berlin, Germany, where she attended the German-American John F Kennedy High School.
 

The Music

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The theme music used in the films on scienceface.org is by Reziproke. It is taken from the song "Not without you", which was composed and played by: Fritz Bayer, Jan Burger, Philipp Schwendke, Johannes von Stamm, Annalie Schutz, Felix Bittner and Fabian Queisner. Reziproke no longer performs, but their music can still be found on their website and can be downloaded from their MySpace page.

The Team

And here is the team who is bringing all that stuff to you and some information about them:

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  • Susanne Milde (Milde Marketing)
  • Sascha Rieger (Milde Marketing)
  • Jan-Peter Hamann (Sichtachse FFP)
  • Joffrey Rieger (Milde Marketing)
  • Marcus Mohring (Milde Marketing)
  • Paul Gavin (Extra Veg Crews)
  • Manfred Gremmer (Guerilla Cut)
  • Jens Thiele (FVT Broadcast Crew)
  • Ronald Thiele (FVT Broadcast Crew)
  • Marco Tidona (
  • Heiko Ulrich (Formgeber)
  • Ute Schlichting (AEI)
  • Ben Wilkins

Special Thanks

We thank all the people and institutions who and which supported our project:

Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam (AIP), Dr. Gabriele Schönherr; Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), Dr. Elke Müller